Better Know a Partner: Delaware North

Credential Engine works with partners large and small across the education and workforce spectrum. What brings us all together is a shared vision to build a transparent credential marketplace in order to bring the clear and comprehensive data students, workers, employers, educators, nonprofits, and policymakers need to make informed decisions about education and career pathways.

Press Release: Credential Engine Bringing Regional Credential Clarity to Los Angeles

For Immediate Release Credential Engine Bringing Regional Credential Clarity to Los Angeles October 30, 2018 (Washington, D.C.)—Today, Credential Engine announced a new initiative, funded by ECMC Foundation, to pursue a regional credential transparency initiative in Los Angeles. Credential Engine estimates there are more than 500,000 unique credentials in the United States alone, including diplomas, certificates,

LRNG Uses Credential Data to Connect Learning Where and When it Happens

By: Connie Yowell, CEO, LRNG and Executive Vice President, SNHU Operating at the intersection of work, education, and community, LRNG builds technology-enabled, community-based work and learning ecosystems. Our goal is to enable young people to define their purpose and find paths to success. We weave together fragmented local education and workforce development systems into a

Press Release: Credential Engine, BrightHive Inc., and University System of Georgia Among Winners of U.S. Department of Education Challenge

For Immediate Release Credential Engine, BrightHive Inc., and University System of Georgia Among Winners of U.S. Department of Education Challenge October 18, 2018 (Washington, D.C.)—The U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Educational Technology announced today that “Competency Catalyst”—a joint project proposal from the University System of Georgia, BrightHive Inc., and Credential Engine to pilot an

Credentials and the Lifelong Learning Cycle

By: Brenda Perea, Director of Education and Workforce Strategies, Credly Go to high school. Go to college and get a degree. Use the skills you learned in college to enter the industry of your choice and start a successful, long-term career. For decades, this traditional education-to-employment paradigm provided a path to success for both employers